The Almost Sisters A Novel By Joshilyn Jackson – Online Free

The Almost Sisters is a novel by famous author Joshilyn Jackson. This is a powerful, emotionally charged Southern novel that confronts the truth about privilege, family. The difference between perception and reality – the stories we tell about ourselves, our origins, and who they really are. Superheroes have always been Leia Birch Briggs’ weak point. The beautiful and mysterious memories we all want to uncover. 

Here are the top 3 reviews and comments that readers love about this fascinating book.

Review 1: The Almost Sisters A Novel audiobook by avid reader

My favorite book in a long time!!

It may be because I am a 70 year old white woman who lives and grew up in the South, but this book really did an unusually good job of depicting life as I know it! It was funny, sad, thought provoking, and a great mystery! The narater was the best I have heard and I have heard a lot. She made me very glad I bought the audio version. I would recommend it to everyone. It’s one I won’t forget.

Review 2: The Almost Sisters A Novel audiobook by Jenna Walker

My new favorite Joshilyn Jackson!

I have been hooked since I first read Gods in Alabama and have either read or listened to everything she’s done, but The Almost Sisters is my new Joshilyn Jackson favorite! I loved that she tackled racism and life in a small southern town (the good, the bad, and the ugly) in a fresh way without making the story too depressing and hopeless. I love her natural Southern voice (so sad when other narrators try to fake it) and think she’s a great narrator! I highly recommend this Audible book!

Review 3: The Almost Sisters A Novel audiobook by Janice

Cluttered story lines

While I have enjoyed many of Jackson’s previous works, this one did not satisfy as well for me. In spite of her usual deft wordsmanship injecting delightful humor in surprising places, there are plotting and pacing problems that made this a bit of a disappointment.

The story is overstuffed with too many subplots and characters, making it impossible to give her usual biting clarity to many of them. The first person POV left many crucial characters flat. The first half of the book moves very slowly, setting up these plot lines, but does pick up at the halfway point.

The thread she uses to tie her plot points together is the subtle and sometimes not so subtle racism and classism that exists in small town southern communities. While her point is a valid one, it was hammered over and over, becoming preachy. The result is a story that is forced and contrived in its effort to bring all the threads together by the end. I was especially disappointed in the lack of depth to the Batman’s character.

Finally, the comic book aspect of the story was truly interesting and integral to the plot. But because graphic novels are by nature a visual art, I found it difficult to get a mind’s eye view of what Jackson was trying to describe. This became a distraction that pulled me out of the story more than once.

Jackson’s narration was generally good, but her Batman was the exception, shifting from a painful stutter to an annoying sexy bedroom voice. Not her best.

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